Governor Ivey Proclaims March as Developmental Disabilities Awareness Month

MONTGOMERY—The State of Alabama has officially recognized March as Developmental Disabilities Awareness Month as of March 1, 2021.

Governor Kay Ivey signed a proclamation designating the month to “promote greater understanding of the issues affecting people with developmental disabilities” and “educate our communities, policymakers, friends and family members, health care providers and businesses that the movement towards full inclusion in community life for persons with developmental disabilities is a positive and worthy goal.”

“We’re glad for the proclamation,” said Darryle Powell, Executive Director of the Alabama Council on Developmental Disabilities (ACDD). “We want to raise awareness of the estimated 110,640 Alabamians born with developmental disabilities—as well as raise expectations. This helps shine a spotlight on our mission of independence, advocacy, productivity and inclusion.”

Kimberly Boswell, Commissioner of the Alabama Department of Mental Health, said, “It’s important for the state as a whole to recognize the achievements of those with developmental disabilities. Every day, they prove how much they contribute to the work and the communities we share.”

Powell added, “This month is also an opportunity to let more people know about the many, many resources we have available to assist people in learning, living independently and pursuing fulfilling jobs and social lives. The more we can educate, the more we can achieve together.”

For more information, contact the Alabama Council on Developmental Disabilities at 334-242-3973 or visit www.acdd.org.

ABOUT THE ALABAMA COUNCIL ON DEVELOPMENTAL DISABILITIES

The Alabama Council on Developmental Disabilities (ACDD) is comprised of 36 governor-appointed volunteer members, including people with developmental disabilities, family members, and representatives of public agencies that serve them. The organization is dedicated to the vision that all Alabamians, regardless of disability, will live, learn, work, and play in inclusive communities. To that end, ACDD works towards system changes in aspects of service/support to promote better lives for individuals with developmental disabilities and their families. For more information, visit www.acdd.org.